Why Wealth Managers Have High Account Minimums

Why Private Wealth Managers Have High Account Minimums & FeesAt a recent investing seminar at LinkedIn, a young engineer asked a question I’ve heard repeatedly over the past year: Why do Private Wealth Managers have such high account minimums?

Financial advisors typically earn handsome livings, especially Private Wealth Managers who work for the big Wall Street firms. Those Private Wealth Managers can easily make $500,000. The top Private Wealth Managers make about $900,000, and that doesn’t include their recruiting bonuses, which often are in the millions. I don’t want to comment on whether this is justified. It’s just the market rate firms pay to attract people to the job, which in most cases means applying Modern Portfolio Theory to a client’s assets.

If you assume an average Private Wealth Manager can actively support 50 client portfolios, and she charges an annual fee of 1% of assets under management, then she needs to attract at least $1 million per client just so the company breaks even on her compensation ($500k/50 *1%).  Add in support staff and corporate overhead, and the breakeven grows to at least $1.5 million per account. Most businesses need to earn a 50% gross margin to take selling and market costs into account; Private Wealth Managers are no different. That means they need at least $3 million to achieve their business model.

The top Private Wealth Managers make about $900,000 annually.

Now you can understand how the better-paid Private Wealth Managers, like the ones you might find at Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and JPMorgan Chase, might require $10 million account minimums.

In his popular WSJ contributed column, “Why Software Is Eating The World,” Marc Andreessen argues that every industry will be disrupted by software. The disruption happens when software eliminates an expensive middleman with no discernable loss of quality. Financial Services, Health Care and Education are some of the last remaining industries to be disrupted. I addressed the reasons why in a column I wrote for PandoDaily.

By eliminating a middleman – the highly paid Private Wealth Manager – Wealthfront can offer a comparable Modern Portfolio Theory-based investment service, with only a $5,000 account minimum.  High account minimums have nothing to do with the quality of the service, and everything to do with the underlying business model.

Tags: , ,

One Response to “Why Wealth Managers Have High Account Minimums”

  1. Timothy J. McNeely November 16, 2012 at 8:49 pm #

    I could not agree with your post more…I was with a big wall street bank for 10 years and had those high minimums. I left and went independent a few years ago, was able to lower my fees, lower my minimum, help more people, and make more money! I can’t touch .25bp but I am glad to see you pushing fees lower. That is good for everyone.

    My industry is ripe for disruption and in a sense my job is at stake. I have two choice…I can get mad and upset and cry foul…Or I can adopt, push forward, and actually have fun seeing my industry disrupted.

    I’m a fan of the second! Keep up the good work. I would love to see the active management business disappear for good. It is nothing more than a legal scam…

Leave a Reply